Nature

Eco-Tastic

Water – it’s a part of our everyday lives. We drink it, swim in it, cook with it; we use it to clean our clothes and cars, and the list goes on and on. But how often do you take the time …

Posted

Water – it’s a part of our everyday lives. We drink it, swim in it, cook with it; we use it to clean our clothes and cars, and the list goes on and on. But how often do you take the time to think about where all that water comes from, or its importance to our ecosystem? As a vital resource to our survival it may be more important than ever to pay close attention to our waterways, especially in such coastal area as Southern New England.

Now don’t go turning the page just yet thinking this is just another boring article about the ecosystem and ramblings of global warming and Al Gore. Instead, I’d like to promote a way that people of all ages can have fun and become educated about Rhode Island coastlines at the same time. Places exist that are fun for the whole family and will leave you more conscientious about the environment, places like

The Narragansett Bay Research Reserve and the Audubon Society of Rhode Island Environmental Education Center, both located in our own backyard. Both are very important to the advancement and sustainability of one of the greatest aspects of the surrounding area. The Narragansett Bay Research Reserve, located on Prudence Island, protects approximately 4,400 acres of land and water, and offers a day that can be filled with learning about the estuary, hiking, swimming, biking, fishing, boating (and not just the ferry) and birding. With opportunities for individuals, families and schools, it is definitely a place that will leave a lasting impression on anyone.

Don’t feel like making the trip out to the island? Head over to Bristol’s Audubon Society Environmental Educational Center. It’s not only a full state-of-the-art history museum, but also an aquarium. You can get an inside look at a Right Whale, learn more about our area’s natural inhabitants and even see a lobster that will probably never make it to your dinner table, the rare blue lobster. Situated on a 28-acre wildlife refuge, the reserve offers a quarter-mile boardwalk that navigates through salt and freshwater marshes, beautiful views of Narragansett Bay and much more. 

It is not too late to educate yourself, and always a great time to educate the little ones, on the importance of our estuaries and eco-system while enjoying yourself at the same time. Plus, the good weather is not going to last too much longer before Mother Nature quickly flips her switch to fall on us New Englanders, so enjoy every last minute you can outside. Now aren’t you glad you didn’t flip the page?